Which states offer deregulated energy?

September 23, 2020   By Caitlin Cosper

Which states offer deregulated energy?

Deregulation has given thousands of Texans the power to choose their energy provider since 2002. But Texas isn’t the only state with a deregulated energy market. There are 16 U.S. states that offer energy deregulation – and some also include a deregulated natural gas market.

Does your state offer energy choice? Read on to find out which states enjoy a deregulated electricity market.

Texas

  • Year of deregulation – 2002
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Available for commercial customers who meet a threshold of usage
  • Fun fact – About 85 percent of Texas enjoys energy choice – the largest percentage of any state!

Connecticut

  • Year of deregulation – 1998
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes, partially
  • Fun fact – The transition to deregulation also required suppliers to use renewable energy as a portion of the power source.

Pennsylvania

  • Year of deregulation – 1996
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – Pennsylvania was one of the first states to encourage deregulation, beginning an investigation into the energy market in 1994.

Massachusetts

  • Year of deregulation – 1998
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – According to estimates, since deregulation began, Massachusetts consumers have saved about $1.5 billion.

New Jersey

  • Year of deregulation – 1999
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – Currently, only about 20 percent of New Jersey residents have taken advantage of their power to choose.

New York

  • Year of deregulation – 1997
  • Natural gas deregulation? – The state does not offer natural gas choice to residential customers.
  • Fun fact – In New York, energy providers are called Energy Services Companies, or ESCOs.

Illinois

  • Year of deregulation – 1997
  • Natural gas deregulation? – About 75 percent of residential customers can enjoy natural gas choice.
  • Fun fact – In Illinois, energy providers are called Alternate Retail Electricity Suppliers, or ARES.

Delaware

  • Year of deregulation – 1999
  • Natural gas deregulation? – No
  • Fun fact – Delaware consumes approximately 100 times more energy than it produces.

Maine

  • Year of deregulation – 2000
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Only for industrial and commercial customers
  • Fun fact – Biomass supplies a quarter of Maine’s net energy generation.

Maryland

  • Year of deregulation – 1999
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Depending on the area, some customers are not eligible for natural gas choice.
  • Fun fact – In 2019, Maryland required 50 percent of the state’s electric sales be generated from renewable power sources by 2030.

Michigan

  • Year of deregulation – 1998
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – Michigan is home to one of the largest pumped storage power plants in the world! The Ludington pumped-storage plant sits on Lake Michigan and holds a generating capacity of more than 2,000 MW.

New Hampshire

  • Year of deregulation – 1998
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Not for residential customers
  • Fun fact – New Hampshire was the first state in the country to begin the process of switching to a deregulated energy market.

Ohio

  • Year of deregulation – 1996
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – Ohio is the country’s eighth-largest producer of ethanol with 7 ethanol plants and a total generating capacity of 680 million gallons annually.

Oregon

  • Year of deregulation – 1997
  • Natural gas deregulation? – No
  • Fun fact – In 2018, Oregon was the nation’s second-largest producer of hydroelectric power.

Rhode Island

  • Year of deregulation – 1996
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Yes
  • Fun fact – As of 2017, competitive energy suppliers in Rhode Island supplied about 47 percent of the state’s electric load.

Virginia

  • Year of deregulation – 2007
  • Natural gas deregulation? – Limited for residential customers
  • Fun fact – In 2018, natural gas accounted for 53 percent of Virginia’s electricity net generation.

 

Caitlin Cosper is a writer within the energy and power industry. Born in Georgia, she attended the University of Georgia before earning her master’s in English at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

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